INTERVIEW. NATHALIE DJURBERG & HANS BERG | SCHIRN


It always starts with an
unspoken question. It’s an exploration every time and it starts as an exploration, trying
to find what it is you’re really looking for which can never really be touched. One of the first things that I could
verbalize for myself about working on the animations is that I didn’t have to
have one image to stand alone or by itself but I could use as many images as
I wanted. It didn’t really feel like that logical, it just happened. I got a super 8 camera from my grandfather, I had a friend showing me how it worked
and I made an animation. In that there was a click because I was bored
of my own preconception of what art was supposed to be. I don’t care about defining what
I’m doing, I don’t care of defining myself
in art history, I don’t define it through history or painting or sculpture. I can take it, I still devour it,
I still examine it, I still look at it but in the studio – that’s a free space. I use whatever I can and no rules
apply in there. That is the free space in my life. The fear around that can go away and
what is left then is space. What I like so much, like making
music for the installations and the films, is that I have actually a framework
to work within because there’s the film. So I have to consider that when
I’m making the music. I just need to find the right environment
for that film and that can be anything. Sometimes it feels like it should be
electronic like pop music, sometimes classical music. The creativity, like the decisions between us –
we don’t really make any decisions, we don’t really talk about it so much. No, because we have been working
for such a long time together and in the beginning I was much more
demanding and much more controlling. And the more I let go of the control, the better Hans’ music was. For us I think is quite important that
no interpretation of the works, like visual and music included, can be wrong. Whatever one person’s experience is,
it is completely right and it might not be the intention
that we had when we were making it but once the work leaves the studio,
it doesn’t belong to us anymore. It belongs to the one watching it
because what is happening then is that it’s taking place inside of them.

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