Sam Werner Military Museum Part 2 | Military Collectors


This week Military Collectors is back in Monteagle
Tennessee. We’ve got more great stuff to show you from
the Sam Werner Military Museum. So much stuff, this is part two of Military
Collectors this week. [music] [Music] This week we’re back in Monteagle
Tennessee. Military Collectors is back at the Sam Werner
Military Museum here and some of you all may recognize the vehicle that I’m leaning up
against. Some may not. There weren’t very many of these made. There’s not many of them left out there, as
many of you collectors may know. The M442 Mighty Mite was a Marine Corps lightweight
aluminum body and I’ve got an expert here, a guest that’s going to be on our show, he’s
been on Military Collectors before, but this is Matt Fox. Quarter-ton Military Parts in
Chickamauga Georgia. But this guy is going to talk to us about
Bud’s Mighty Mite passion and his collection. Matt, welcome back, tell me about the Mighty
Mite and the passion here that.. [Matt] Well, the Mighty Might was, was a one-time-use
vehicle. I mean, you, you basically, you transported
it to its position, you used it up, before you left you destroyed it. And they’re only maybe 3,500, give or take,
made of these things and since they were so disposable and being Marine Corps Jeep, Marine
Corps was rough on vehicles and when they were done with them they were done with them. [Bob] How big was the Mighty Mite to Bud? Just as a passionate collector. [Matt] Bud wanted to be the king of Mighty
Mites! Oh, he, oh my gosh, he had so many of these
things. [Bob] How many, how many do you know, walking
around the yard, I mean, gosh we saw hulk after… [Matt] Oh, there’s, there’s probably…. 60 left, but I mean, he had hundreds of
them, I mean, he was, they got him out of Barstow, they got them out of Lejeune, they
got him out of Aniston. He wanted to be the king of Mighty Mites and
he had this vision of being the king. [Bob] Well, you know, the parts that he had,
I mean, and new old stock and (Oh, yeah!) there still here and you guys have spent eight
years just trying to sort it all out and you’re not even close to being done. [Matt] We haven’t made a dent in it. We’ve not made a dent in it. [Bob] Well, with the Mighty Mite collection,
I mean, I know these, this is very unique and rare because it is an original (Yeah,
you don’t see them camouflage) and these, this is a longer version, the yellow, this
is a One Mark V Marines, I mean, tell me, is it a passion of yours as well? [Matt] Uh, I never have really been, yeah,
really, I really haven’t been in the Mighty Mites but, you know, as the older surplus
is drying up, you got to move up to the newer, newer things and there’s a market out there
for these because they’re so rare and they’re very collectible and if there’s a market people
need parts and so if we can provide the parts form we will. [Bob] Well, I’m gonna ask you, a vehicle like
this, to a collector just walking up to somebody and says, “Okay, how much you want for it?” What would it normally go today in the today’s
market? [Matt] A totally restored one, the top dollar
on it just absolutely beauty, you’re looking 15 to 16 thousand. (Right.) They don’t bring the huge amounts that a lot
of your World War II Jeeps and stuff like that do because they’re just not, they just
haven’t taken off. They, they’re just, they’re so few out there
people don’t really know much about them. It’s kind of a unique little vehicle. (Wow.) Air-cooled engine, aluminum bodied, quarter
elliptical suspension, yeah, they’re they’re funny little vehicles. [Bob] Well, with all the parts that he had
and still the parts for you guys to uncover, I just think this is going to be the next
thing that everybody’s got to have out there. And you know as a collector, you know what
I’m talking about. You saw it here first on Military Collectors
and Matt, (Yeah, man!) keep collecting, keep restoring, keep building and then hey, keep
everything open out there. And folks, when Military Collectors comes
back, we’re going to talk to a special friend and board member here at the Werner Military
Museum that really was close to Bud and I think you’ll enjoy listening to what he had
to say a very special collector friend. [break] If you are interested in preserving and collecting
military vehicles, whether you’re a military veteran or just have a love for military vehicles
in general, then you may be interested in joining the Military Vehicle Preservation
Association. The MBPA is dedicated to providing an International
Organization for military vehicle enthusiasts. For more information, and all the benefits
a member receives with joining the Military Vehicle Preservation Association, go online
at MVPA.org. Every soldiers training is the same but their
story is their own. From the fields of Gettysburg, to the tanks
rolling across the sands of Kuwait, the story of the mounted soldier is a story of mobility,
speed and the historic power to shift the mighty tides of war. The National Armor and Cavalry Heritage Foundation
is asking for your help in keeping the legacy of the United States armored and cavalry and
telling the stories for many years to come. I’m a little bit country. and I’m a little bit rock and roll. I’m a little bit Memphis and Nashville. With a little bit of Mo-town in my soul. I don’t know if it’s good or bad. But I know I love it so. I’m a little bit country and a little bit
rock and roll. The all-new Chevy Silverado. It’s a little bit country and it’s a little
bit rock and roll. [Music] For 50 years, Ranger Boats has been paying
tribute to America’s armed forces and their families. Not only in the United States, but those men
and women who serve all over the world. At Ranger Boats, we appreciate the dedication
that these men and women do each and every day. Protecting and preserving the very foundations
of our freedom. Ranger Boats wants to give back to America’s
real heroes with our operation troop salute program. For more information visit RangerBoats.com
today. [Music] [Bob] We’re here at the Sam Werner Military
Museum and I’ve got a very, very special guest, a lifelong friend and actually grew up around
Bud and his dad over in Tracy City and that’s Freddie Cunningham. And he’s also a board member here of the Sam
Werner Military Museum Foundation. Freddie, I want to, I want to welcome you
to Military Collectors this week but you, you know, I tell you, you’ve got a special
story that you want to tell all these folks about this, this MB here. (Yeah.) Okay, tell me a little bit about the history
behind this, this belonged to Bud and his dad, right? [Freddie] Bud and his dad. And this is a, was a Jeep, was hid for years. And I was over there from 1971 up until he,
Bud’s passing. And in every Friday, Saturday and Sunday evening,
we’d be sitting in the living room eating popcorn and Mr. Samuel would say, “Bud, you turn that motor?” And it, Bud would say, “No.” [Bob] So, you’d be turned the motor with the
crank. [Freddie] Yeah, no, turn to, turn the motor
with the crank. (Yeah.) Just like that. Like that, that’s all of it would take and
this went on for years, for long as I can remember, that was a daily or monthly thing
they would do to make sure this motor would not stick. [Bob] Well, in the chicken coop, well, what,
why did, why did he put it in there? [Freddie] Hide it from somebody. Really, keep from somebody finding and all
was showing, is see, it’s all, it’s all original… (Cosmoline.) Cosmoline. Cosmolined up the plugs and everything. (Oh, my goodness.) And, we call this the barn find. (Wow!) and, and it was hidden on Carl’s chicken
house and I never found it till we pulled it out the trailer two years ago. (Really?) Yeah, and that was about what the one of the
stories that I could tell but there’s a lot more that I could tell but it’d take a long
time. [Bob] Well, Freddie listen, and, and I want
to say folks about Freddie here, Freddie’s a cancer survivor God bless you. For all of that and the Good Lord has healed
you, although you lost your leg. (Yes.) but you’re still here as an active participant
and you know, I know, I know Bud is looking down (Oh, yeah!) on you guys, of what you
guys are doing here with his collection. (Yeah) and carrying on his legacy. [Freddie] That’s what I want to do. (There you go.) I mean, I, I really want to carry on what
he wanted us to do and that’s what I’m doing! [Bob] Well, hopefully folks will come here
and see this they’ll come see you and they could hear more stories, okay. [Freddie] Yeah, and there’s more stories I
can tell about him, his dad and my grandmother, they some, some pretty good ones. [Bob] Well, I tell you what I’ll do, when
I come back, I’m gonna bring some popcorn. (Yeah!) I’ll bring a portable TV, we’ll come in on
Sunday and tell stories. [Freddie] Yeah, yeah sir, that’d be great! There you go, well folks, listen, when Military
Collectors comes back we’re gonna have more great things to show you from the Werner Military
Museum in Monteagle, Tennessee. [Announcer] If you have missed any past episodes
of Military Collectors be sure to go online at militarycollectorstv.com and you can see,
not only past episodes, but also read in-depth features on the people and their passion of
their military collections. [break] Unforgettable memories begin the moment you
pick up your first Browning. Unmatched security, fire protection and storage
options, Browning will be with you through a lifetime. Protecting your guns and all the cherished
memories you make with them. Keep your Browning memories safe. I’m a little bit country. and I’m a little bit rock and roll. I’m a little bit Memphis and Nashville. With a little bit of Mo-town in my soul. I don’t know if it’s good or bad. But I know I love it so. I’m a little bit country and a little bit
rock and roll. The all-new Chevy Silverado. It’s a little bit country and it’s a little
bit rock and roll. [Music] Take a moment to think about the food you
buy and eat. Is it fresh? I mean, really fresh or is it shipped from
a grower hundreds or even thousands of miles away. Well, here in South Carolina, we celebrate
fresh, locally grown food and unforgettable meals with family and friends. So, choose food that’s rooted right here. Choose certified SC grown. It’s a matter of taste. [Music] [Bob] Well, before we head on back over to the Sam Werner Military Museum in Monteagle,
Tennessee, y’all write me all the time, you send me email notes, “Bob, we’d love to see
more restoration projects on Military Collectors.” Well, I’ve got another one for you and it
happens to be one that I just acquired about a year and a half ago. It was a 1942 Dodge WC 53 Carry All. Now again, if you’re familiar with the Dodge
WC series, you will know that a lot of them were made by Dodge back during the war. Some will estimate that there was over 600,000
Dodge vehicles made during World War II. Well, the WC 53 Carry All was kind of a special
deal. They had half-ton Carry Alls early in the
war and then in 1942 they come up with a 3/4 ton that was on the same frame as this WC
57 and the 54 Ambulance behind me. They put it on a 3/4 ton frame and I was,
well, I was lucky enough to acquire one of these about a year and a half ago and I’ve
always wanted a Carry All and it is just one of those vehicles, again, between six and
seven thousand were made. Other accounts, there may have been eight
thousand but it was a particularly vehicle that they wanted to carry, uh, command and
staff as well as General Officers to use it as a staff car. Well, like the WC 57 and the 56 Command Cars,
it became readily known as carrying somebody of prominence and the enemy bombed them every
time they saw them out on the road. So, it probably was not one of those vehicles
that was safe to ride in during the war. So, they didn’t make them, they stopped and
I was lucky enough to get a Carry-All. Now, a little bit of story about this one. It came from the Southwestern desert area
in California. So, it was relatively rust free as you can
see, once I got it, I put it on the trailer and I had to carry it down to a friend of
mine in Eustis, Florida, Mr. Lindsey Orr. And on another series that we do this season
on Military Collectors, Lindsey is my go-to guy when it comes to doing paint and bodywork
on these old Dodge vehicles, but this is going to be Lindsey’s first crack at doing a Dodge
WC 53 Carry All or actually I guess any Dodge WC 57 or 50 series. So, with that, this thing was in relatively
complete assembly, again no rust, I had all the bells and whistles with it, an engine
that was, well, it ran but it was not the right engine for the truck because these trucks
originally came with a T2 14 engine and here later in the restoration of all these military
vehicles that T2 14 flat head 6 engine is one of those highly sought after not many
of them still out there. There’s a lot of them that are sitting in
some of these old trucks. You might see them on the side of the road,
folks used them for logging vehicles back in the day, especially way out west, because
a lot of these came from that desert environment where there wasn’t a lot of rust and that’s
the only reason that many of them survived. Mine, well, you might say that, “Well, why
Bob, did you do the paint and bodywork first?” Well, sometimes you have to go with the guy
that takes you to the dance and Lindsey had an opening in his schedule and doing the paint
and bodywork, I had to get it done, so that’s why I took it on down to his place. As you could see the disassembly of this vehicle
it was relatively simple except with a couple of exceptions. The wood in the back had to be all disassembled,
the bolts had to be cut, all the glass was broken so, that had to all be replaced. All the window crank mechanisms, all the door
mechanisms, all of that stuff had to be disassembled. Now, Lindsey took off a lot of the engine
parts for me and the old engine he sandblasted because I’m going to save it, but in a later
episode of Military Collectors, we’re going to talk to the folks down in Jacksonville,
Florida who actually are going to rebuild and do the T2 14 engine that I found from
a friend of mine who actually owned my Command Car, okay, so, I guess what I’m saying here
is, this family of collectors is a really small net and there’s a lot of guys who collect
these vehicles who are known to others. They sell parts, they buy parts, vehicles,
they sell parts and so the eye of that needle, not only is it small, but what goes around
comes around, because a lot of these guys have done it for years and you’ll get to meet
some of those guys on later episodes. Well, back with me now is Parker Lowdes, he
is the Chairman of the Foundation here at the Werner Military Museum and you know Bud,
he loved wheel vehicles, okay, and all that, but he also loved armor too and so tell me
about this row right here because this is this is kind of a unique piece here. [Parker] All right, so we have three pieces
here the first one is an M5 Stuart tank. We are in the process of making it a static
display. When we found it, in his collection as we
saw earlier in one of the episodes, this had trees growing all up out of it, so, it was
in the woods. We had to cut all the trees out, get it moved
over here, so we’ve sand blasted it and painted the outside to make it a static display. We’re eventually going to try to go inside
and restore it from the inside out and then try to get it running eventually. [Bob] Well Parker, let me ask you a question,
out all of the armament, all the turret, all that was on here. [Parker] Everything’s on there, just like
you saw, other than the… (Engine?) This still has two twin Cadillac engines in
it. The ah… everything was here and in place just as you
see it. Other than not quite as pretty on the outside. (And this one is serial number?) Serial number 961, so as we were (Early production!) So, we were, sand blasting and we found the
serial number on it. It’s a neat piece. (Yeah, okay, and now and this one the next
one.) Here was a Greyhound. Is a M20 Ford Greyhound and likewise it’s
uh, you know, it’s of course is a wheeled vehicle instead of a track vehicle, but it
still has what… (Its armor!) It is armored and in Bud liked this one, because
he could get in and out of it a little easier. [laughs] And then the one behind it is a 114
all aluminum armored scout car and… [Bob] These were used heavily in Vietnam. [Parker] These were in Vietnam. [Bob] So, was he fond of the Vietnam because
I know in his collection there’s a lot of 151 vehicles and that sort of thing or did
he care? [Paker] I think he was fond of anything that
was OD green would be perfectly honest with you. This particular one, you can walk around the
back. When we started on it, it had about 16 or
18 inches of sand and leaves and we have, we’ve cleaned it out to try to make it a display
model and this one actually ran back in the seventies when he originally got it. [Bob] Wow! Okay Parker, we moved from the one one four
over here Vietnam and now let’s take it back to step okay kind of where it all started,
huh, yeah, and you got Hambone the mule. Right? [Parker] So, before, of course, all the armor
pieces, the military had a lot of mules and horses and matter of fact, Camp Forest down
here, which was the local base in the early 40s, had 2,800 horses and mules even during
the 1943 Tennessee maneuvers that they were doing they had that many in stables down there. This is a 1907 Studebaker. You can still see U.S. written here on the side (Oh, yeah!) Non- restored, but we’re proud of, proud of
going on back in history and then also as we start off in one of the other segments
we have in 1915 White and as we talked about earlier some of the old Liberty trucks from
from World War I came out and became, this one became a log truck up here. And was one of the things we talked about
early on with the Werner family, going back to the saw milling business and industry. [Bob] Well, now, are any of these still left
on the property you think? [Parker] There are a couple remnants of the
old White truck still over there in the woods. [Bob] Wow, that’s just, that’s just unbelievable… (Yeah.) …at this guy’s collection. [Parker] You can look on the inside of all
the things that were in here. [Bob] Wow! I mean, it’s just amazing that this survived,
it really… (Yes, it is.) You know, and of course, it’s, it’s all right
here at the tribute to Sam’s collection and you, you all have done a tremendous job. So, I would just have to tell you, thank you
so much for showing us around on this here piece because, I’ll tell you folks, Military
Collectors, we’re out there looking for that unique collector and these guys have kept
Sam “Bud” Werner’s collection alive right here in Monteagle, Tennessee. So, again, log on to Werner Military Museum
.com or go Military Collectors Tv.com and you can come up here and see this wonderful
collection. And again, if you’re a veteran, you need to
come and stop by. We got more stuff to go look at, listen, (Yes
sir!) you just keep looking. [break] For 50 years, Ranger Boats has been paying
tribute to America’s armed forces and their families. Not only in the United States, but those men
and women who serve all over the world. At Ranger Boats, we appreciate the dedication
that these men and women do each and every day. Protecting and preserving the very foundations
of our freedom. Ranger Boats wants to give back to America’s
real heroes with our operation troop salute program. For more information visit RangerBoats.com
today. Every soldiers training is the same but their
story is their own. From the fields of Gettysburg, to the tanks
rolling across the sands of Kuwait, the story of the mounted soldier is a story of mobility,
speed and the historic power to shift the mighty tides of war. The National Armor and Cavalry Heritage Foundation
is asking for your help in keeping the legacy of the United States armored and cavalry and
telling the stories for many years to come. If you are interested in preserving and collecting
military vehicles, whether you’re a military veteran or just have a love for military vehicles
in general, then you may be interested in joining the Military Vehicle Preservation
Association. The MBPA is dedicated to providing an International
Organization for military vehicle enthusiasts. For more information, and all the benefits
a member receives with joining the Military Vehicle Preservation Association, go online
at MVPA.org. [Music] [Bob] Well, welcome back to Military
Collectors. I’m back here with Parker Lowdes, he’s the
chairman of the Sam Werner Military Museum Foundation here in Monteagle, Tennessee and
as we’re doing an overview of this wonderful museum and tribute to Sam “Bud” Werner, you
know, Parker, this week we’ve focused on some great things on the show and of course even
last week we saw where it all started and we’re at the compound so I want to give the
folks… It’s hard to do justice to this collection
in 30 minutes or even an hour or many hours! You could do a documentary. But as we walk and talk here, Sam’s legacy
is all right here plus there’s more that you haven’t even got out yet. (Right.) So, let’s kind of what do you think Sam would
want us to see as we close out show number two this way. [Parker] So, in a, in a quick summary of this,
the museum is set up with basically War War II going down this aisle. Korea going across the back, Vietnam and then
in the Desert Storm. See here beside us, we have a Ford GT B. A lot of people know it as a Burma Jeep but
it’s a bomb truck. (Yeah.) We go on into several Jeeps here, one a navy
shore patrol Jeep. We also have something fairly unique, that
we really like, and this is a Chaplains Jeep. Complete with all of the communion set for
going out and serving sacraments in the field. Along with all the manuals. We have a variety of different religious books
that have been collected with this. A pump organ so they can, can, can fold out
and go play music. This Jeep is very unique. It actually has a graphed plotter in the back. There is a GPS of what we would know today
but this one is set up to keep up and track and make small plots that we lay over the
top of existing maps. We have, of course, a Command Car here and
it’s great because this was came back from the lend-lease program out of Switzerland
long with some of the other vehicles saying today. This is an MT Tug. There were 15 of these built this happens
to be serial number six. As you spin on around the backside over here,
you’ll see the vehicles that were typically used during Korea time frame and from the
M38 up through the M38 A 1s. The big thing sitting in the corner is called
High Helen. Light armoured division made three of those
and basically it’s an M 38 A 1 with adapters on it so they could try to have a vehicle
that would track along with track vehicles as far as width of track in heights. Because if you were following a 38 81, you’re
always falling off into one of the ruts on one side of the other. As we turn the corner, we have some Mighty
Mites that were built for the Marine Corps. (And again, Bud’s favorite, the Mighty Mite.) He had a lot of these since this was one of
his favorite jeeps. He, I think he tried the corner the market
on collecting them as well as, collecting all the parts for ’em. (Okay, on this side?) Okay, on this side, we have several pieces. This is the Sparrow Hawk Missile Launcher
without the upper structure on it. We’re in the process of getting ready to restore
it. We have three Mules here. Two-wheel, four-wheel, steer and we also have
a diesel-powered one in the back one a few that I think that they converted over trying
to go with with a new diesel engine in it. Across the way over here we have the series
of M15 1s all the way up through all the different series including hard tops, military police. We have a couple Humvees in here. This is a this high-top part one is one of
the few that we’ve seen with that particular body style and then the other one over here
is one of the early first ones they came out for testing and, and go through and see what,
you know, how the vehicle performed. There were a lot of changes. This particular one, they found out that it
had a flaw where it would pop up and get the old pan. And crossing over certain ditches. [Bob] Well, you know, I’ll tell you Parker,
it is a beautiful facility, okay, and, and I know as a tribute to Bud, you guys are going
to keep this collection alive for history. The kids that come in here, the educational
benefits and values, that’s really what we’re trying to do is well with you, and so, Godspeed! I will tell you, I know Bud’s looking at all
of you all and he’s very he has to be proud. (Well, thank you.) And so with that, folks, I will tell you on
Military Collectors, we’re always trying to bring the unique and Parker has done that
with all of his Foundation here in Monteagle, Tennessee. If you’re headed to Nashville, you’re on I-24,
stop on in. It’s not very far from Chattanooga. Log on the Military Collectors Tv.com. You can also go to their website there or
you can log on to Werner Military Museum .com. Come on up here, it is worth the time to stop. Bring the kids bring the family, okay, if
your a veteran out there, come on up, because I will tell you, you’ll find something here
that’s unique for you, like me, there are some of these things that I have put a lot
of “butt time” in, okay, and I know you will as well. We’ll see you next week on another episode
of Military Collectors.

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